Friday, April 07, 2056

Seminar note links


Image by Bluefluke


John Will

7 Oct 2018 - Advanced Crucifix
7 Apr 2018 - Butterfly Guard
4 Mar 2018 - Turtle Defence
11 Nov 2017 - Pirate Grip, Russian Tie
15 Oct 2017 - Half Guard, the Seed
5 Mar 2017 - Ashi Garami 2.0, Honey Hole and Heel Hook
9 Oct 2016 - Ashi Garami, straight footlock
John Will Seminar 16 April 2016- Legbars
21 Feb 2016 - collar grip guard, single leg X guard
30 Aug 2015 - post clinch takedown strategy, Z guard, kneeride
22 Feb 2015 - Snatch Single, Vale Tudo Guard, Darce/Anaconda
24 August 2014 - a Spider Guard Plan
23 Feb 2014 - Advanced Spider Guard
29th September 2013 - Crucifix Control
24 March 2013 - X Guard
21 Oct 2012 - ankle picks, Z guard
21 April 2012 - Z guard
25 Mar 2012 - Guard Passing
2 Oct 2011 - takedown strategy, 2 on 1
20 Aug 2011 - D'arce choke, Deep Half Guard
3 July 2011 Side control escapes and counters
John Will Seminar 16 Apr 2011 - attacking from the turtle
20 Mar 2011 - Hooks and hooking sweeps
24 Oct 2010 - Anaconda, D'arce, Peruvian Necktie, Shackle
15 Aug 2010 - Back Control
14 Mar 2010 - Kata Gatame
18 Oct 2009 - Getting the back, back attacks
1 August 2009 breaking out of the clinch, roundhouse kicks and takedowns
4th April 2009 - hooking sweeps, S Mount armbar
1 Nov 2008 - open guard, side control escapes
5 April 2008 - Shell, Omoplata
20 Oct 2007 - X guard
Jul 28, 2007 - MMA defence from bottom, darce
31 MAR 2007 Shell in depth and takedowns
29 October 2006 - Triangles,knees in guard. passing half guard, visor
29 July 2006 - handstand sweep, side back escapes
8 Apr 2006 - turtle escapes, pillow escape
9 Jul 2005 - half guard bottom
9 Apr 2005 - better choke and armbar from mount
23 Oct 2004 - hooks-in and side back techs
10 Jul 2004 armdrag from guard, crossface
6 Mar 2004 - sweeps, legbar against open guard, passing
18 Oct 2003 - basic takedowns, legbars

Interested in going to a seminar with John Will? Check his seminar schedule and sign up.

Steve Maxwell

Steve Maxwell's Jiu Jitsu for a Lifetime seminar - 3 Feb 2018
Steve Maxwell's Jiu Jitsu for a Lifetime Seminar 4 Feb 2017
Steve Maxwell's Integrated Breathing Seminar 11th February 2017
Steve Maxwell - Gracie Jiu Jitsu Core Concepts - 11 Feb 2017
Steve Maxwell's Jiu Jitsu for a lifetime /Mobility Conditioning for Jiu Jitsu and MMA seminar 6th February 2016
Steve Maxwell's Jiu Jitsu for Life seminar - 14 March 2015

Carlos Machado

Carlos Machado Seminar - 7th May 2018
Carlos Machado Seminar - 7th May 2015
Carlos Machado seminar - 8th May 2014
Carlos Machado seminar 16 May 2013
Carlos Machado seminar 10 May 2012

Rigan Machado

The Gathering 2017
Rigan Machado 17 Sep 2016
Rigan Machado Seminar 15 Sep 2007
Rigan Machado Seminar 21 Aug 2004

Jean Jacques Machado

Jean Jacques Machado seminar 28 July 2012

Richard Norton

Richard Norton seminar 21 November 2015

Gui Mendes

"Secret Session" at Langes MMA with Gui Mendes

Dave Camarillo

Dave Camarillo 21 Sep 2018 - Pinning and the Tackle Pass
Dave Camarillo 16 Sep 2017 - offside grip, King's chair, SAP
Dave Camarillo seminar 3 Sep 2016 - Kimura grip, armbar

Pedro Sauer

Pedro Sauer 24 Oct 2016

Stanley Tam

Stanley Tam Qigong Seminar 25 Feb 2017

Rodney King

Crazy Monkey Defense System 10th June 2018

Sunday, October 07, 2018

John Will Seminar 7 Oct 2018 - Advanced Crucifix


The seminar was held at Rick Spain's Red Boat Wing Chun Academy in Redfern.

The crucifix is a variant of back control, with one arm trapped by your legs. The essence of back control is to keep your chest glued to your training partner's back, and it applies equally here.

This seminar assumed a basic knowledge of the crucifix. An earlier seminar we took with John in 2013 covered more fundamental aspects of the position.

29th September 2013 - Crucifix Control

IMPORTANT: John no longer recommends the common setup where you trap the guy's near arm with your leg from side/back control and roll forward over his back. He has seen or heard of several neck injuries from heads being driven into the mat when partners reacted too violently. Plus it is usually less effort to pull them back toward you once the controls are secured.


John Will and Sean Kirkwood demonstrate the Crucifix position

The Hunter's Drill


We hunt the crucifix position and when our partner tries to escape, we hunt and reclaim it again.

Crucifix Entry from Head to Head


We sprawl on him and get a front headlock, our R arm around his neck and our L arm around his R armpit and neck. We come up on our toes and drive him back, pushing his butt onto his heels and we stand up, until our hands touch our L knee. Drive into him, don't pull him toward us.

We push our L knee between his R arm and his torso, trapping pinching his R upper arm between our legs. We turn slightly to our R. We change our grips on his upper body so our L arm goes under his L armpit from the back, our R arm around his neck. The L hand grabs his R wrist, so we have the same grips as if we had a seat belt grip from IBJJF-sanctioned back control.

We step our L foot slightly in front of our R foot, then sit/fall down onto our left side, so his R arm is trapped between our legs and our arms encircle his head and L arm. The position of John and Sean Kirkwood on the photo above is the position we want, but on the other side.

The Hunter's Drill Itself


He will want to escape as he would from back control, by getting his back and shoulders on the ground, sliding down onto the mat toward his feet.

As soon as we realise we are losing the position, we change to a kimura grip on his L hand. Our R arm comes across his face so we no longer encircle his head, and we grab his L wrist with our R hand and our own R wrist with our L hand under his L arm.

He frees his R arm from our legs (for the drill, let him do it!) and turns L to his knees. We also turn L to our knees, keeping our grips, So we are kneeling next to him on his L. This position is called the "Kimura Dogfight". We post our head on the ground, keeping the kimura grip, come up on our toes and walk toward our head, this lifting our hips, so we can post on our head and jump over him to his R side. Come up on our R foot and put our weight toward our L hip, so we can snag his R arm behind our R shin and knee, Change our upper body grips to a seat belt, going under his L armpit, as before.

Fall to our L now and we are back in the same crucifix position.

Repeat.

(iI may be possible or sometimes desirable to get the seat belt grip again before snagging the leg after you have jumped over. I need to experiment with this.)

With the seat belt, we generally grab the wirst of the arm around the neck with the other hand, the one under the armpit. If he tries to strip our grip he will peel off the top armpit hand, and we go directly for the choke with the other. If our hands were the other way round and he peels the top, choking, neck hnad off, we do not have that option.


Crucifix Entry from Side Control


We have side control on his R side. His hands are up, protecting the neck, elbows in.

We switch base towards his head, to switchbase side control, our R arm under his L. Our L hand slides between his R forearm and chest, and grips his R shoulder, thus starting to separate his arm from his torso. Use our L elbow to pry his R hand further away from his chest. Our L leg sweeps up and over his face and snags his R arm, dragging it away to our L, so we can pinch it between both our knees and push them and his arm to the mat.

Reach over our L leg and grab the sleeve of his R arm, pinched under our L knee.Move our L foot above our R shin and post it around his shoulder level. Our R fist posts next to his L hip.

We push up on our R hand and L foot, swinging our R knee to meet our R wrist, in a knee ride position, still gripping his R sleeve with our L hand so his R arm is under our L leg.

We grab his R collar with our R hand, and hoist him up to a sitting position. We turn slightly to our R, pinching his R arm between our legs, similar to the first technique. As before we get a seat belt grip on his back, our L arm underhooking his. We sit/fall back to the crucifix as before.

John said he uses this method, sweeping the knee backward, to get kneeride from side control almost exclusively these days. The standard way of just jumping straight up from side control gives a quick player on the bottom too much opportunity to get his knee in and go to guard while you're trying to get your knee in.

First Choke


In setting up any choke from the seat belt, we want to start by pulling the choking arm in tight, before we release the seat belt grip. So from the crucifix position with his R arm trapped and the seat belt grip we have achieved, pull with our L hand and drive our R forearm in under his chin and into his throat. This will prevent him being able to drop his chin to his chest and foil our subsequent choking moves.

Turn on our L side, and use the L arm to open his L collar and get a deep grip on it with our R, thumb inside.

Now we do two things at once:

  1. Slide our hips underneath his shoulders, going towards flat on our back again. You will need to post on your feet at least a little to do this.
  2. Move your L arm out in a wide arc, snagging his L elbow, ending up with our L hand grabbing the back of our head, this effectively trapping his L arm.

We should end up close to flat on our back - not so far that he could backward roll and escape.

From here, we just pull our R elbow to the mat for a strong choke.

snag the throat - turn on your side   - get a deep grip - Slide hips under him and snag his arm so you are flat on your back - pull elbow to the ground

Enhanced Choke


This is an enhanced version of the choke that makes any escape far more difficult. However, we MUST have a DEEP collar grip first. Otherwise, failure is an option, and a likely one.

We set up the deep collar grip with our R hand, thumb inside, as above.

This time, we move our hips so they are next to his, our L hip up against his R. We take our L leg over the top of his R leg, and hook out L instep under his R calf or Achilles tendon. We use this grapevine-style hook to lift his R foot off the mat, so he cannot bridge or post with it. Our R foot goes under his R hip.

We do not need to trap his L arm like before, we can just grip his L shoulder from behind.

We choke him pretty much the same way.

Our hips next to his makes it much harder for him to free his R arm from our leg control, or to bridge and roll backward, etc.

Upstream / Downstream


The above techniques all result in us landing in the crucifix with the arm trapped by our legs pointing "upstream", with the top leg (in the cases above, our R leg) hooking his arm and his hand more or less pointing toward his head, like an Americana.

It is also possible for us to trap his arm using the bottom leg (for the above, the L leg) with his hand pointing more toward his feet, like a Kimura. This we call the "downstream" control.

Both allow us to apply different submissions. In particular, the downstream configuration frees up our top leg to allow us to employ it for submissions without losing the arm.



Sorry, this was irresistible - but you too can be the Puppet Master with these Crucifix techniques ;)

Entry to Downstream


From Head to Head, he shoots at your legs. You sprawl to avoid the takedown. You move up on him slightly and get a "butt seatbelt" grip around his R leg and hip - your L arm goes under hi groin, the R arm over his butt - your R arm in line with his intergluteal cleft, or in more common parlance, his butt crack. John's words!

Slide your R knee in under his L elbow, R knee going between his L elbow and knee, as you use the grip around his R hip to pull and roll him toward you onto his L side. Your R shin hooks over his L elbow to trap his arm, as you hold it down under the outside of your R knee on the mat .

You now have a crucifix, except this time you are controlling his arm with your bottom leg and controlling his hip instead. It should be fairly easy to slip your L elbow over his R arm, controlling it under your L armpit.

Hell Choke - Jigoku Jime


From the position you are in, reach over and grab his L far collar with your L hand, thumb inside, palm down. Your L leg comes over his head and hooks his R ear in the crook of your L knee. Your R leg still has L arm trapped. You can grab his pants at the R knee or underhook his R leg with your R hand for extra control, which is always a good idea. Choke him by pushing his head away with your L leg wihile pulling his L collar toward you with your L hand. This is a very strong choke. It does not require a deep grip with the L hand and will work with more stretchy material like a T shirt just fine.

As John pointed out, it is ironic that a Hell Choke comes from a crucifix position.




Judo version of both upstream and downstream versions of the Hell Choke (Jigoku-Jime). With a different setup.

Transitions

We need options when our partner starts to escape, and we start to lose the position. We need a Zen attitude here, where over attachment to a position can result in our downfall. A time to kill, a time to heal.

A time to hold, a time to transition.


To everything there is a season

We have the crucifix and seat belt control, his R arm trapped. He starts to shimmy down toward his feet, trying to get his shoulders on the mat and escape.

We transition to the kimura grip on his L arm as for the Hunter's Drill above.

Kimura


"Float" his elbow by getting your L elbow/forearm underneath it, so it is "floating" off the mat.

Hip escape away from him and turn face down, feet behind you so you are 180 degrees to him , driving your R elbow to the mat. He is flat on his back. Your R hip should be next to his L ear. You never release the kimura grips. Move forward and try to snag his shoulder with the bottom of your rib cage. flatten out and sink into the mat, applying kimura pressure to his elbow and shoulder. This may be enough for a tap.

If not, we move around to side control on his R side and apply the top kimura proper. Key points - Our R hip is dropped to the ground and our R leg stretched back as far as possible to stop him sitting up and rolling us. We step over his head with our L leg with our foot on the ground, which also stops him sitting up, but its main purposes is as an engine to drive him up on his R side enough so we can crank his arm without the ground getting in the way.

Armbar


He starts to escape, we get the kimura grip as before. He manages to turn away from us and get up on his L elbow.

We keep the kimura grip. We slide our L knee through the gap he has made between his elbow, his chest, and the mat. Our R leg goes over his head, and pulls it back to our R to the mat. We drive our L knee and hips under him and up, turning onto our back and into an armbar position.

Whether we want to bring our R leg out and over his body for the arm bar or leave it where it is depends on a number of factors.

If we do want to take it over, the safest way is to keep out knees pinched and take them to our R toward his head, this keeping his arm tightly controlled. this allows the foot to come out so we can take it to the far side of his torso without compromising our control.

Kimura Dogfight and Crucifix on the Other side


He starts to escape, we get the kimura grip. This time he manages to turn to his L all the way to his knees. We follow him turning L to our knees. keeping our grips, as per the Hunter's drill.

Now we post our R knee on his L thigh, in a sort of mini knee ride, giving us enough room to stuff his arm between our legs, catching it in a downstream position.

We get a seatbelt grip on his back, but on the other side, our R arm under his R armpit and L arm around his neck, our R hand gripping our L wrist,

We pivot on our knees, taking our feet clockwise as far out to the left as we can, keeping his L arm trapped. We fall onto our R hip, ending up in a downstream crucifix, his L arm trapped.

"Desert Island" Drill


It should be apparent that this gives the opportunity a different take on the first, Hunter's Drill. From here, he could start escaping, we get the kimura grip on the other side, go to the kimura dogfight with him, stuff the arm, and end up in another crucifix on the original side.

We could mix the two drills up, getting crucifixes and drilling on both sides, interspersing upstream and downstream.

John talked of his project to devise such drills for every position family in Jiu Jitsu, so that one could devise the entire panthen of Jiu Jitsu systems from those drills. If you were trapped on a desert island with no instructor (though presumably, with other people to train with).



Other Links


29th September 2013 - Crucifix Control
 - mentioned above, more fundamental material.

11 Nov 2017 - Pirate Grip, Russian Tie - has an entry to the crucifix from the Russian Tie when he is turtled near the end. Can be started from your guard.



Monday, September 24, 2018

Dave Camarillo 21 Sep 2018



The seminar was held at Higher Jiu Jitsu, in the City of Sydney PCYC, hosted by head instructor John Smallios.

The seminar was no gi. The techniques are equally applicable to gi, MMA, and possibly self defense or law enforcement arrest techniques.

Warm up Games and Drills


Start from a wrestling crouch. Attempt to touch your partner's knee with your hand and not get tapped yourself, while he attempts to do the same and stop you tapping his knee. If you get tapped, do a pushup.

Switch it up so everyone in the room is trying to tap everyone else's knee.

Same starting position, look to get a two handed grip on one of his wrists, then get your head in a good control position under the side of his jaw and drive him around for a few moments. Reset.

Same as above, but try to get an arm drag position, with the other hand controlling his wrist. Same head position as above.

A drill, no resistance from your partner - arm drag, to two on one,  shoulder pressure and turn to front headlock, drive him down so at least one of his hands is on the floor, turn and take his back. Swap.

Guard passing and/while pinning


All passes should end up in a pin. Dave's system does its best to allow us to pin our opponent all the way through the pass.

Three fundamental concepts to understand are:


  • The elbow line
  • The knee line
  • The battle zone


The battle zone is the area between the opponent's elbow, knee and hip on the side to which you are trying to pass. So your objective, for example when passing to his R or trying to maintain side control there, is to occupy the space between his R knee, hip, and elbow.

In these passes, we stay low, and try to keep the opponent pinned with pressure, and when possible, grips, as much as possible throughout the movements.

Passing Half Guard, with no Knee Shield


We apply "OCD of the knee." Both the bottom and top guys should be obsessed with occupying the battle zone with our knee.

He has our R leg in half guard. We should go straight for a far side underhook on his L arm with ouR R. Our head is posted on the mat next to his R ear, looking out to our L, driving our head into his, bending his neck to his L. Our L foot is out to the L. We are keeping our R hip low as possible so as to turn him on his R side with his R knee on the mat.

We control his bottom R knee with either our L hand, or if we have the flexibility, our L foot, holding it place so he cannot follow our R knee as we move it toward his head.

We free our R knee from his half guard, by tripoding up on our R toes, lifting the hips, holding his R knee in place as we extract our knee from his guard. As soon as we can, we drop our R knee over his R thigh, thus using it to occupy the battlezone. We do not take our head from the mat or loosen our far side underhook at any time, we stay as low as possible.

Once the knee occupies the battlezone, we can stop holding his knee in place with our L hand or foot. We drag his R elbow out from his body with our L hand and get an underhook on his R arm with our L. We join our hands in S, butterfly or gable grip under the base of his neck, flaring our elbows out to separate his arms from his torso.

Use our L foot on his top R knee to push it toward his feet and free our R foot.

We move to side control, short base, hiding our R foot. We move back/down slightly to lower our base even more and increase the pinning pressure. Our head stays next to the R side of his head.

As he moves to try and create space to escape, we must similar move to reclaim that space. If he moves his hips away to our R, rein him back in by clinching hard with the R elbow, and chasing down his hip with or R knee, driven from our toes.

If he manages to recover half guard at any stage, or later on, repeat the process. If our position gets compromised at any stage setting up the pass, back out and reset.

Passing Butterfly Guard, using the Tackle Pass


We start learning the pass in a position where he is on his back. We are on our feet. His shins are inside our thighs and we are in effect sitting on his shins. Stay upright so as not to give him gripping opportunities on our upper body.

We sit/push down on him using our bodyweight. hoping to get him to react by kicking us off using his shins. As he kicks, we straighten our legs and lift our hips, while "diving" forward over his knees, wrapping our arms around his thighs above his knees, like a rugby tackle. The grip Dave uses is one hand grabbing the other forearm, like an anaconda choke or guillotine.

Our head goes next to his R hip as we switch off to our R, twisting our torso to the R, driving our R shoulder into his abdomen or hips, pinching the grip by pulling our elbows in. We should be facing his knees.

Get our L knee under his knees, and his it to drive his legs out to our L, his R, flattening his torso out, but with his legs twisted to our L we can now hunt with our arms for the double underhook pin position we used in the first pass.

We could also drive his legs further still with our L knee until his R knee is on the mat, and drive our L knee between his thighs to achieve the classic leg drag pass position. From here we could pass, or fairly easily sit back to the Irimi Ashi Garami position (John Danaher's terminology, check Google) and start working your heel hook game.

Passing Z guard with the Tackle Pass


Z guard is half guard with a knee shield. Assume he has our R leg caught again. Our starting position for the pass is to be upright. We do not put any pressure on his knee shield. We should already eave our knee up and over his bottom R thigh, fairly close to the groin, because we also want to grab his R knee from underneath with our L hand. Grabbing the knee both prevents him getting a base from which to do a technical standup or slide backward to bail out of Z guard, and will allow us to get our arm underneath him and encircle his legs when we go for the pass.

We stand, lift our hips and "dive" over his knee shield as before, our arms encircling his legs. Once we have the grip, over his thighs, we sprawl hard, driving our R leg back,, flattening the knee shield and our hips to the mat, freeing our leg. We keep our weight on his legs.

If his legs stay flat, we may be able to just crawl up to a mount position, where we get the double underhooks and head control as for the first technique.

Otherwise, we can drive his legs across as before with out knees, this time to out R. We can look this time at sliding our bottom L knee under his legs, stepping over them with our R foot, then coming in top, triangling our legs around his knees, R ankle behind our L knee. We can move up to mount here. Or switch off to side control at any time we feel our mount is being compromised. There is ample opportunity to use wind shield wiper, grapevine and other leg work techniques here to change positions and move around his defences and counters.

This video, from the excellent Sonny Brown, shows how the "leg clamp" Dave shows as a prelude to getting the mount is used extensively in MMA by Khabib Nurmagomedov, among others.



Setups - Up/Down, Left/Right


Up/Down: if the guy is sitting up as you approach him, grab his ankles and flip him onto his back, pushing his legs over his head. As he reacts by rolling forward and sitting up, drive forward through his half guard, going for the first half guard passing technique above, with OCD of the knee, head position and the far side underhook. If he gets the knee shield, we go for the tackle pass.

Left/Right: push one or both of his knees to one side. His reaction, swinging them back in the other direction, will give you an opening to go for the tackle pass.

Up/down and left/right should be seen as principles rather than specific techniques. You always need to adapt to the actual movements of your opponent.

Troubleshooting and Maintaining Control


If his legs stay flat diring the tackle pass, we have the opportunity to go to mount. If he starts lifting his knees before we consolidate the mount, we should be prepared to switch to side control.

If he have the double underhook elbow control, and he is pushing our head away, we can just slide our linked grips down to his thighs to a tackle pass position, and work our way back, We are so far away from his arms in the tackle pass positions as to negate the value of any attempt to pass.

We do need to be careful of guillotine attempts, though these are of limited value when the head is on one side and the legs on the other. The choke is pretty much unworkable then, while at the same time we are given the opportunity for a Von Flue choke.

We should be able to keep constant pinning pressure with the body lock on him all the way from the elbow line to the knee line and back.

If he starts sitting up while we have the tackle position, we need to break him down immediately. Dave did this when the guy came up his elbow by grabbing the posting forearm with one hand around the front and one around the back, pulling the guy toward him while driving forward and breaking him back down. Try to stop such counters immediately, before he can post all the way up on his hand.

In Sun Tzu's The Art of War, military leaders are advised to take high ground and let the enemy try to attack from a lower position. Fighting from an elevated position is said to be easier for a number of tactical reasons. Holding the high ground offers an elevated vantage point with a wide field of view, enabling surveillance of the surrounding landscape, in contrast to valleys which offer a limited field of view.



So, don't let your opponent up.

Once we have our hands linked around him, we can in effect slide them up and down his body between the elbow line and knee line, switching sides and positions, constantly adjusting to nullify his attempted defense's and counters and keep ahead of him as he tries to catch up in the OODA loop.

Realistically, we may need to release and regrab our grips, especially if the mats are not slippery and thus not conducive to easily sliding our clasped hands up and down his body.

He gets an Underhook


We have the bodylock side control with double underhooks we reached after the first pass. Somehow he manages to get an underhook, say with his L arm under our R arm.

We switch to head and arm position (scarf hold / kesa gatame / headlock control). Dave will keep his hands clasped rather than change to more conventional hand controls here. Lift his head off the mat so he cannot bridge.

We turn our head to look towards his feet, bridge up slightly, turn our body toward his feet, walk our feet in the same direction, as we drop our L elbow to the mat near his R hip to occupy the battle zone, reach over and behind his legs and encircle his thighs with our arms as we turn into the tackle pass position, with our head on his L hip and our L shoulder controlling his hip.

While we are turning from kesa gatame, our weight distribution should be such that we are trying to keep him turned slightly to his R side. This both makes the tackle pass setup easier, and also makes it much harder for him to roll us to his left.

Dave is not a fan of kesa Gatame as a long term control - he feels the back is too exposed, especially if the guy has access to a blade with his untapped hand (the one he got the underhook with). I can't argue with this, though I'd like to hear Josh Barnett's opinion as well ;)

Go to SAP (standard armbar position)


We get the double underhooks elbow line side control from the first pass, on his R side.

We move our head from the R side of his head to pinching his L arm between our R arm and R ear. We take our L arm out from under and pass the L hand under his chin and get the L elbow on the ground, our arms encircling and isolating his L arm. We can now drag him up on his R side with our R underhook, and then start hunting for the Kimura position and then move to the standard armbar position (SAP) per Dave's first seminar in 2016.

Conclusion


These moves are as much about concepts and principles than specific technique. We need to constantly adapt to his movements and stay at least one step ahead. Dave reminded us of the Zen of position - not becoming too attached to a position and trying to hold onto it once it becomes compromised. Move on to a more suitable position.

Dave is all about systems. Systems are all about dilemmas for the opponent. Ryan Hall and John Danaher also talk about this on their instructionals.

Videos


Similar but different approach here:



Similar ideas from Lachlan Giles:



This is not quite the same thing, but this BJJ Scout video of the Miyao brothers no gi bodylock passing style has some interesting parallels. Interesting ideas about blocking his hip movement.:


Links to Previous Seminars with Dave Camarillo



Until 2019...



Monday, September 17, 2018

IBJJF Rules and Knee Reaping - Gordon Ryan, Texas Cloverleaf

Gordon Ryan is a successful Brazilian Jiu Jitsu competitor at elite levels. Much of his earlier success came in competitions with rulesets allowing use of a range of leglock techniques which are banned by the most popular sport Jiu Jitsu body, the International Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Federation (IBJJF).

Gordon Ryan trains under John Danaher, a celebrated Jiu Jitsu and MMA coach operating out of the Renzo Gracie academy in New York. Several of John Danaher's students have done very well using his leglock system in professional matches, most notably Gordon Ryan, Gary Tonon, and Eddie Cummings. These students are sometimes referred to as the Danaher Death Squad (DDS).

Some in the Jiu Jitsu community regard the IBJJF Jiu Jitsu competitions as the pinnacle, and imply that the DDS's supposed "avoidance" of IBJJF competitions, and preference for lower profile (though not necessarily less challenging) competitions meant they had yet to be tested at the top levels of the sport. Also, that as leglock specialists they were in effect "one trick ponies", who had not developed the fully rounded Jiu Jitsu skills required to be regarded as truly elite.

Gordon Ryan recently put such criticisms to bed by winning double gold at the 2018 Pan Jiu-Jitsu IBJJF No Gi Championship. This under IBJJF rules, which allow no "knee reaping" or heel hooks, which are the DDS' bread and butter in non-IBJJF competitions.

Interestingly, he enquired about and addressed the various issues surrounding the legality of various leglocks, especially from the cross ashi garami (411 / honey hole / inside sankaku) position, after a detailed discussion of the rules with the Pan's head referee.

This article contains a couple of videos where Gordon explains what he learned. Unfortunately the sound quality is not great, and, despite what the article claims, is no better if you view the videos on Instagram, where they were originally published.

The takeaways are:

The cross ashi position is only illegal if the foot of the opponent's leg trapped by your legs, the "inside" foot, is also trapped between your armpit and hip.

So an underhook or "scoop " grip on the inside leg in cross ashi is perfectly legal.

Overhooking the "outside" ankle, the one on the leg not trapped by your legs, is also legal in cross ashi. This is John Danaher's "double trouble" position, so called because you are controlling both legs.

BUT ... combining the outside leg overhook and inside leg underhook in the "Texas Cloverleaf" submission is illegal and will get you disqualified.


The Texas Cloverleaf

This seems to be contradictory and inconsistent. I queried this via Facebook Messenger with David "Silver Fox" Karcher, "The Grappling Referee" on social media. While he is not the IBJJF head referee, he did attend an IBJJF rules meeting in Boston recently where the subject was discussed in detail. I have corresponded with him on Facebook for a while and respect his opinions, though quite often he seems as perplexed as anyone about certain match situations shown on video.

According to Mr Karcher:
It's about isolating the reaped leg, either by attacking the foot, clamping the foot, or trapping the foot in the Cloverleaf. 
if you can move the foot or escape the foot, its legal. 
the thought process is if the foot is trapped, you can hurt the knee.
There are Youtube videos of people winning IBJJF athletes winning matches with the Texas Cloverleaf, but as far as I can tell these all happened before the current knee reaping rules were introduced in 2015. I read somewhere where a person on social media claimed a referee disqualified him for a Teexas Cloverleaf in 2018, and the referee told him afterwards that the submission was legal in 2017 but not 2018. I have no way of determining the veracity of these claims.

The rules remain inconsistent and arguably even contradictory in places, and leave grey areas in aa number of situations. This is likely to always be the case in a constantly changing sport with almost infinite possibilities. We referees just have to keep doing the best we possibly can for the competitors, I guess.

Monday, August 20, 2018

Wing Chun Forms

These videos are of myself performing Wing Chun forms - which are solo movement patterns, analogous to kata in Japanese systems.

These forms are from the Traditional Wing Chun system of William Cheung. My instructor, Rick Spain, teaches them with modified stances and extra footwork from those normally taught in a Traditional Wing Chun school, but he claims that these are variations first demonstrated to him by William Cheung.

I believe that forms should be passed on from instructor to student as they were taught. However, after a decade or more in the art, I believe it is beneficial to experiment. Rick Spain's senior studentss may experiment with the forms as regarding sequencing, different footwork, adding or removing techniques, etc.

Surely there comes a time where a half decent student should start thinking for him/herself. Progress in most human endeavours comes from creativity and experimentation, not blind adherence to tradition. Traditional Chinese Martial Arts seems to be regarded as different by some, but in my opinion for no good reason.

As noted by Jordan Peterson, tradition requires constant regeneration through close attention to changing times, and creativity. Wilful blindness to changing conditions leads to stagnation and death. Horus and Osiris.

I was aged 62 or 63 when all of these videos were taken. I am an adherent of the maxim, "slow is smooth and smooth is fast."

I started training in Kung Fu in 1977, Wing Chun in 1988. I am also a student of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu which I began studying in 1998, and in which I currently hold a black belt first degree.

Siu Lim Tao


This is the first form of Wing Chun. Note the front stances and incorporation of baasic footwork with the striking. I include another form, Tien Shou / Heavenly Hand, from David Crook's Bac Fu Do system, in this video after SLT.


Chum Kil


This is the intermediate empty hand form of Wing Chun. I recorded this on New Year's Eve, 2017/2018, so there is a related missage at the end.


Bil Jee


This is the third empty hand form, usually taught last.





Butterfly Swords


There are two Wing Chun weapons, as the system is usually taught. The short weapons are the twin Butterfly swords. Arguably I am coming close to breaking the law here by practicing with these weapons in public even though these are unsharpened practice weapons.


The other weapon usually taught in Wing Chun is the Dragon pole, A heavy, tapered pole ranging in length from approximately six to thirteen feet. It is held at one end and brandished more like a spear than like the Japanese bo. I may publish a video of myself executing this form at some future time.

In keeping with the necessary spirit of Creativity and innovation, many practioners practice with other weapons from Filipino Martial Arts, other Chines or Japanese systems. or Western martial traditions. I have dabbled with combat folders, karambit, La Canne and Uno Baston Dos Manos, for example, though I would not claim any great expertise in any of them.

Extra


Here I am performing the San Chien (Three Strengths) form from Bac Fu Do, a system taught by David Crook. There are similarities ot the Sanchin kata of some karate styles. I was going through the 22/22 pushup challenge at the time, so you get to see some staggered hand pushups as well.